Release Management 2015 with Build vNext: Component to Artifact Name Matching and Other Fun Gotchas

I’ve been setting up a couple of VMs in Azure with a TFS demo. Part of the demo is release management, and I finally got to upgrade Release Management to the 2015 release. I wanted to test integrating with the new build vNext engine. I faced some “fun” gotchas along the way. Here are my findings.

Enable SAFe Features in Existing Team Projects After Upgrading to TFS 2015

TFS 2015 has almost reached RTM! If you upgrade to CTP2, you’ll see a ton of new features, not least of which are significant backlog and board improvements, the identity control, Team Project rename, expanded features for Basic users, the new Build Engine, PRs and policies for Git repos and more. Because of the schema changes required for Team Project rename, this update can take a while. If you have large databases, you may want to run the “pre-upgrade” utility that will allow you to prep your server while it’s still online and decrease the time required to do the upgrade (which will need to be done offline).

My First VSO Extension: Retry Build

Visual Studio Online (VSO) and TFS 2015 keep getting better and better. One of the coolest features to surface recently is the ability to add (supported) extensions to VSO. My good friend Tiago Pascoal managed to hack VSO to add extensions a while ago, but it was achieved via browser extensions, not through a supported VSO extensibility framework. Now Tiago can add his extensions in an official manner!

Aurelia – Debugging from within Visual Studio

In my last couple of posts I’ve spoken about the amazing Javascript framework, Aurelia, that I’ve been coding in. Visual Studio is my IDE of choice – not only because I’m used to it but because it’s just a brilliant editor – even for Javascript, Html and other web technologies. If you’re using VS for web development, make sure that you install Web Essentials – as the name implies, it’s essential!

Reflections on DSC for Release Management

A couple of months ago I did a series of posts (this one has the summary of all my RM/DSC posts) about using PowerShell DSC in Release Management. I set out to see if I could create a DSC script that RM could invoke that would prep the environment and install the application. I managed to get it going, but never felt particularly good about the final solution – it always felt a little bit hacky. Not the entire solution per se – really just the application bit.

Pagination


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